My History of Stalking

 

This may come as a shock to some of you, but I have a history of stalking.

It’s true, as soon as I meet someone new, provided I remember their name or something about them, I will Google them, Facebook them, Twitter them and proceed to find out as much as I can about them via the magic of the Internet.

It’s only when this comes up in conversation that I remember not everyone does the same. Sure, some people do it when they are about to go out on a date (to make sure they other person is not a REAL stalker, no doubt!) or before purchasing a big-ticket item from someone on Craigslist. The extent of my curiosity has raised more than a few eyebrows, however, and though I understand the arguments to the contrary, I think that making information about yourself available and being able to find out information about others is a step forward for society, not a step back.

But first, let’s address the issues people usually have with my stalkerish ways.

One argument that often comes up is that it takes some of the mystery out of meeting someone. The investigative process that once took years can now take minutes, and all those fun little idiosyncrasies might be outed prematurely. What’s there to talk about if you already know what bands they like, politicians they hate, and have already seen their photos from their trip to the Grand Canyon.

Another argument goes something like this: as more information about you becomes available online, the less control you have over your reputation. If there is a vehicle (like Facebook) available where people can post photos of you and tag them with your name, those photos are much more likely to show up in search results, thereby staining your otherwise spotless reputation.

My issue with both of these arguments is that they don’t consider 1) the direction the world and its relationship with technology is going, 2) the benefits that come with the baggage of having a ‘brand you’ online, and 3) that having a hands-off attitude toward the Internet and its impact on the real world can be much more harmful than taking the time to use it thoughtfully.

It’s undeniable that as the global populace becomes more and more comfortable with the Internet and other technologies, styles and customs and people are changing as well. This is an invention that changed the global economy, and at the same time it has changed our vernacular and religions and how we read maps and just about everything else in the world. To think that by not putting information about yourself online you will keep that information secret is a false assumption. Similarly, to deny yourself access to the same flow of information that everyone else has access to hurts no one but you. To be out of the loop is not romantic; it’s foolhardy.

Think of all the things we have today that are made possible by technology. GPS. One-click purchasing of just about anything from your mobile phone. Video games that operate by reading your brain waves. It’s incredible, really, but to get the full benefit from these technologies, in many cases you have to sacrifice a portion of your anonymity. You cannot take full advantage of 23andMe‘s at-home DNA test without spitting into a cup and sending it off to be analyzed in a lab. That in itself could be construed as pretty violating to some, but even more value can be gained by making your genetic information available on their partner-site, Ancestry.com. It’s like karma: the more you give, the more you get.

Think of it! You can find people who are related to your by having your DNA analyzed, from home, and then connect with relatives you didn’t know you had online through a social network. We live in the future, people, but if you aren’t willing to give a little and contribute to the global information wiki, then you miss on out the premium fruits of humanity’s labor.

Finally, by not playing an active role in the flow of information (especially as it relates to you), your personal brand can suffer. Anything negative or untrue will go unchallenged, either because you don’t know about it or because you don’t have enough of a reputation online to challenge it with authority. It’s a big responsibility, and perhaps not one that you would have chosen to take on, but if you do care what is attributed to your name, the reality is that you had better play at least a small part in the digital sector lest you should be left without recourse because of your disinterest.

46 comments

  1. I think it’s best to have your Facebook settings done so that no one can tag you in a photo without your permission. I heard a horrible story of a guy whose friend thought it would be a cool joke to put a photo up on his Facebook wall of the guy snorting coke when he was younger. You have to do everything you can to iniot proof your Facebook as much as possible.

  2. I think it’s best to have your Facebook settings done so that no one can tag you in a photo without your permission. I heard a horrible story of a guy whose friend thought it would be a cool joke to put a photo up on his Facebook wall of the guy snorting coke when he was younger. You have to do everything you can to iniot proof your Facebook as much as possible.

  3. I’m with you 110% on this. Although I wouldn’t consider myself a stalker, I do look people up from time to time and see what they’re all about. People who are uncomfortable with this need to understand that times have changed, and the world as we know it is changing. You can either adapt or fall waaaaay out of the loop. Great post!

  4. I’m with you 110% on this. Although I wouldn’t consider myself a stalker, I do look people up from time to time and see what they’re all about. People who are uncomfortable with this need to understand that times have changed, and the world as we know it is changing. You can either adapt or fall waaaaay out of the loop. Great post!

  5. I’m with you 110% on this. Although I wouldn’t consider myself a stalker, I do look people up from time to time and see what they’re all about. People who are uncomfortable with this need to understand that times have changed, and the world as we know it is changing. You can either adapt or fall waaaaay out of the loop. Great post!

  6. I agree, why shouldn’t we be taking full advantage of the information available? A large reason online dating has become so popular is the ability to screen someone before that first date. I want to know what you look like, what your interests are, and generally what you like to do on a Friday night. But more importantly than that, I want to know what you think of yourself. What out there in cyberspace have you taken the time to shape? What did you write yourself? What do others say about you?

    For me, Googling someone is an easy way to get a lot of “my favorite food is sushi” type information about them, but it’s also a super easy way to see how they relate to themselves and others.

    To say that all of this takes the mystery out of getting to know someone is naive and, honestly, undervalues the person you’re trying to get to know. There’s a lot of information about people online, but there’s a lot that’s not (especially in regards to people who monitor their personal brand). I would much rather read about them liking sushi, so I don’t have to waste my in-person time on the menial and can rather jump into what really makes them tick.

  7. I agree, why shouldn’t we be taking full advantage of the information available? A large reason online dating has become so popular is the ability to screen someone before that first date. I want to know what you look like, what your interests are, and generally what you like to do on a Friday night. But more importantly than that, I want to know what you think of yourself. What out there in cyberspace have you taken the time to shape? What did you write yourself? What do others say about you?

    For me, Googling someone is an easy way to get a lot of “my favorite food is sushi” type information about them, but it’s also a super easy way to see how they relate to themselves and others.

    To say that all of this takes the mystery out of getting to know someone is naive and, honestly, undervalues the person you’re trying to get to know. There’s a lot of information about people online, but there’s a lot that’s not (especially in regards to people who monitor their personal brand). I would much rather read about them liking sushi, so I don’t have to waste my in-person time on the menial and can rather jump into what really makes them tick.

  8. I agree, why shouldn’t we be taking full advantage of the information available? A large reason online dating has become so popular is the ability to screen someone before that first date. I want to know what you look like, what your interests are, and generally what you like to do on a Friday night. But more importantly than that, I want to know what you think of yourself. What out there in cyberspace have you taken the time to shape? What did you write yourself? What do others say about you?

    For me, Googling someone is an easy way to get a lot of “my favorite food is sushi” type information about them, but it’s also a super easy way to see how they relate to themselves and others.

    To say that all of this takes the mystery out of getting to know someone is naive and, honestly, undervalues the person you’re trying to get to know. There’s a lot of information about people online, but there’s a lot that’s not (especially in regards to people who monitor their personal brand). I would much rather read about them liking sushi, so I don’t have to waste my in-person time on the menial and can rather jump into what really makes them tick.

  9. Not sure if you will find a lot of meaningful relationships this way. We are becoming more machine and less human.

  10. Not sure if you will find a lot of meaningful relationships this way. We are becoming more machine and less human.

  11. @Gordie: Oof, that sounds pretty painful. And yeah, if you aren’t an active part of the Facebook community, you likely wouldn’t even know a photo was up with your name in the caption. The best defense is knowledge, in this case.

    @Nate: The stalker moniker was more of a statement than what I really believe myself to be, but it’s true what you say about either being a part of it or falling out of the loop. I know people who refuse to have a profile anywhere online and they seldom check their email, if they have it. And you know what? They’re left out. They don’t know about the parties or the weddings or the relationships people are in. It’s a shame, but refusing to communicate in the way the everyone else is because you prefer the old ways just shows a lack of flexibility and misguided stubbornness.

    @Kristin: Totally. I personally have had a great time with online dating, and as you said, it speeds things forward so that you can get to the more core aspects of a person, rather than focusing on the candy coating.

    @Wendyness: I have now!

    @Bezhad: I’ve never hidden the fact that I want to be a cyborg. ASAP. But seriously, just because the method of communication is vastly different than it was 50 years ago, the important stuff is still the same. There are details that have changed, but what it means to connect with someone hasn’t and won’t change (until our minds are all linked up to a massive computer, at which point we won’t even need to communicate…it will be gloooorious!).

  12. @Gordie: Oof, that sounds pretty painful. And yeah, if you aren’t an active part of the Facebook community, you likely wouldn’t even know a photo was up with your name in the caption. The best defense is knowledge, in this case.

    @Nate: The stalker moniker was more of a statement than what I really believe myself to be, but it’s true what you say about either being a part of it or falling out of the loop. I know people who refuse to have a profile anywhere online and they seldom check their email, if they have it. And you know what? They’re left out. They don’t know about the parties or the weddings or the relationships people are in. It’s a shame, but refusing to communicate in the way the everyone else is because you prefer the old ways just shows a lack of flexibility and misguided stubbornness.

    @Kristin: Totally. I personally have had a great time with online dating, and as you said, it speeds things forward so that you can get to the more core aspects of a person, rather than focusing on the candy coating.

    @Wendyness: I have now!

    @Bezhad: I’ve never hidden the fact that I want to be a cyborg. ASAP. But seriously, just because the method of communication is vastly different than it was 50 years ago, the important stuff is still the same. There are details that have changed, but what it means to connect with someone hasn’t and won’t change (until our minds are all linked up to a massive computer, at which point we won’t even need to communicate…it will be gloooorious!).

  13. @Gordie: Oof, that sounds pretty painful. And yeah, if you aren’t an active part of the Facebook community, you likely wouldn’t even know a photo was up with your name in the caption. The best defense is knowledge, in this case.

    @Nate: The stalker moniker was more of a statement than what I really believe myself to be, but it’s true what you say about either being a part of it or falling out of the loop. I know people who refuse to have a profile anywhere online and they seldom check their email, if they have it. And you know what? They’re left out. They don’t know about the parties or the weddings or the relationships people are in. It’s a shame, but refusing to communicate in the way the everyone else is because you prefer the old ways just shows a lack of flexibility and misguided stubbornness.

    @Kristin: Totally. I personally have had a great time with online dating, and as you said, it speeds things forward so that you can get to the more core aspects of a person, rather than focusing on the candy coating.

    @Wendyness: I have now!

    @Bezhad: I’ve never hidden the fact that I want to be a cyborg. ASAP. But seriously, just because the method of communication is vastly different than it was 50 years ago, the important stuff is still the same. There are details that have changed, but what it means to connect with someone hasn’t and won’t change (until our minds are all linked up to a massive computer, at which point we won’t even need to communicate…it will be gloooorious!).

  14. @Gordie: Oof, that sounds pretty painful. And yeah, if you aren’t an active part of the Facebook community, you likely wouldn’t even know a photo was up with your name in the caption. The best defense is knowledge, in this case.

    @Nate: The stalker moniker was more of a statement than what I really believe myself to be, but it’s true what you say about either being a part of it or falling out of the loop. I know people who refuse to have a profile anywhere online and they seldom check their email, if they have it. And you know what? They’re left out. They don’t know about the parties or the weddings or the relationships people are in. It’s a shame, but refusing to communicate in the way the everyone else is because you prefer the old ways just shows a lack of flexibility and misguided stubbornness.

    @Kristin: Totally. I personally have had a great time with online dating, and as you said, it speeds things forward so that you can get to the more core aspects of a person, rather than focusing on the candy coating.

    @Wendyness: I have now!

    @Bezhad: I’ve never hidden the fact that I want to be a cyborg. ASAP. But seriously, just because the method of communication is vastly different than it was 50 years ago, the important stuff is still the same. There are details that have changed, but what it means to connect with someone hasn’t and won’t change (until our minds are all linked up to a massive computer, at which point we won’t even need to communicate…it will be gloooorious!).

  15. @colin You mentioned online dating, been there done that, what I found is that people who are dating online are like kids in a candy store. They send off the same email to large number of potentials and juggle/lie and hide the truth until they land someone that has passed all their tests. It is not for me, might be for others but it totally takes away from the human part of connecting. Sure online dating has its advantaged, but it also allows people to hide behind their monitors and deliver not so true facts about themselves. To me a waste of time. In person you can immediately watch someones facial expression, body language etc.. to conclude an impression of that person.

  16. @colin You mentioned online dating, been there done that, what I found is that people who are dating online are like kids in a candy store. They send off the same email to large number of potentials and juggle/lie and hide the truth until they land someone that has passed all their tests. It is not for me, might be for others but it totally takes away from the human part of connecting. Sure online dating has its advantaged, but it also allows people to hide behind their monitors and deliver not so true facts about themselves. To me a waste of time. In person you can immediately watch someones facial expression, body language etc.. to conclude an impression of that person.

  17. @colin You mentioned online dating, been there done that, what I found is that people who are dating online are like kids in a candy store. They send off the same email to large number of potentials and juggle/lie and hide the truth until they land someone that has passed all their tests. It is not for me, might be for others but it totally takes away from the human part of connecting. Sure online dating has its advantaged, but it also allows people to hide behind their monitors and deliver not so true facts about themselves. To me a waste of time. In person you can immediately watch someones facial expression, body language etc.. to conclude an impression of that person.

  18. Great post! I google people all the time as well, and never thought I would be doing that 10 years ago… Times have definitely changed!

  19. Great post! I google people all the time as well, and never thought I would be doing that 10 years ago… Times have definitely changed!

  20. Great post! I google people all the time as well, and never thought I would be doing that 10 years ago… Times have definitely changed!

  21. Guilty. Unashamed. I’ve never been party to – or even heard of – an instance in which informational tidbit-collecting wasn’t of some benefit. “Benefit” is a nicely expansive term, no?

  22. Guilty. Unashamed. I’ve never been party to – or even heard of – an instance in which informational tidbit-collecting wasn’t of some benefit. “Benefit” is a nicely expansive term, no?

  23. Guilty. Unashamed. I’ve never been party to – or even heard of – an instance in which informational tidbit-collecting wasn’t of some benefit. “Benefit” is a nicely expansive term, no?

  24. Guilty. Unashamed. I’ve never been party to – or even heard of – an instance in which informational tidbit-collecting wasn’t of some benefit. “Benefit” is a nicely expansive term, no?

  25. I don’t think that one can get an accurate image of another person’s character just by looking at some typed details; written text is sterile by nature (only 7% of communication is the words used; 93% is missing through internet text!), and we are inclined to augment it with our own imagination, using our own experiences, prejudices, and current mood as a frame of reference. This can (and usually does) distort the truth, leading to disinformed expectations.

    Having an actual discussion with someone is a far superior and quicker way of assessing them, as you can hear explanations and details in real-time with the person’s own tone of voice, inflections, facial expressions, and body language.

    I may be biased though, since I seem to be among that rare breed that doesn’t use Twitter and visits Facebook maybe once a month. :)

    oh, and that home DNA test looks really cool!! definitely doing it. thanks for the link.

  26. I don’t think that one can get an accurate image of another person’s character just by looking at some typed details; written text is sterile by nature (only 7% of communication is the words used; 93% is missing through internet text!), and we are inclined to augment it with our own imagination, using our own experiences, prejudices, and current mood as a frame of reference. This can (and usually does) distort the truth, leading to disinformed expectations.

    Having an actual discussion with someone is a far superior and quicker way of assessing them, as you can hear explanations and details in real-time with the person’s own tone of voice, inflections, facial expressions, and body language.

    I may be biased though, since I seem to be among that rare breed that doesn’t use Twitter and visits Facebook maybe once a month. :)

    oh, and that home DNA test looks really cool!! definitely doing it. thanks for the link.

  27. I don’t think that one can get an accurate image of another person’s character just by looking at some typed details; written text is sterile by nature (only 7% of communication is the words used; 93% is missing through internet text!), and we are inclined to augment it with our own imagination, using our own experiences, prejudices, and current mood as a frame of reference. This can (and usually does) distort the truth, leading to disinformed expectations.

    Having an actual discussion with someone is a far superior and quicker way of assessing them, as you can hear explanations and details in real-time with the person’s own tone of voice, inflections, facial expressions, and body language.

    I may be biased though, since I seem to be among that rare breed that doesn’t use Twitter and visits Facebook maybe once a month. :)

    oh, and that home DNA test looks really cool!! definitely doing it. thanks for the link.

  28. I don’t think that one can get an accurate image of another person’s character just by looking at some typed details; written text is sterile by nature (only 7% of communication is the words used; 93% is missing through internet text!), and we are inclined to augment it with our own imagination, using our own experiences, prejudices, and current mood as a frame of reference. This can (and usually does) distort the truth, leading to disinformed expectations.

    Having an actual discussion with someone is a far superior and quicker way of assessing them, as you can hear explanations and details in real-time with the person’s own tone of voice, inflections, facial expressions, and body language.

    I may be biased though, since I seem to be among that rare breed that doesn’t use Twitter and visits Facebook maybe once a month. :)

    oh, and that home DNA test looks really cool!! definitely doing it. thanks for the link.

  29. I have a friend who does the same. He’s really good at id, and he does it just for curiosity. I usually limit myself on a simple google search, because I like to know who I’m talking with. Nice post!

    P.S. I voted for your next trip :D

    Oscar

  30. I have a friend who does the same. He’s really good at id, and he does it just for curiosity. I usually limit myself on a simple google search, because I like to know who I’m talking with. Nice post!

    P.S. I voted for your next trip :D

    Oscar

  31. I have a friend who does the same. He’s really good at id, and he does it just for curiosity. I usually limit myself on a simple google search, because I like to know who I’m talking with. Nice post!

    P.S. I voted for your next trip :D

    Oscar

  32. @Andrew: You’ve open Pandora’s Box here my friend :) Thanks for the link! I signed up and am figuring out how useful it is, now.

    @Bezhad: I must respectfully disagree with you, sir! My last relationship, which was quite a lovely one, started online (we met on a free dating site, in fact), and though the majority of people on those sites might use the tactics you describe (i.e. have no e-game), there are many people who are just looking to make a connection online which can then be transferred over to the real world, where you can then go about the ‘normal’ process, seeing all the body language, facial expressions, etc. I would recommend online dating to everyone…more and more it’s professionals of all ages who are sick of the same old bar/club scene or who simply don’t have time to go out and meet new people in their day-to-day.

    @Lillian: Isn’t it wonderful living in the future? Now where are those flying cars we were promised?

    @’Nette: Absolutely. The less I know, the more uncomfortable I feel. Why feel uncomfortable? Life’s too short.

    @Sebastian: Thanks for the comment, Sebastian. I agree that in-person communication is ideal, but 1) that’s not always possible, and 2) I would say that the even more ideal ideal is to have a conversation in person after already knowing something about them from the Internet. Even if it is a bit sterile (not always the case) or biased (okay, usually the case), you can learn as much from that as anything else. It may be that it takes spending more time online to pick up on those intricacies (the same way it takes some experience talking to people in real life to be able to pick up on the full spectrum of those intricacies) but my thought is that denying yourself any piece of available information is a handicap.

    Then again, I spend a significant part of my time online, so I might be biased :)

    The 23andMe service is really cool and definitely worth it. My family got it for my father (who is a genealogy enthusiast) and it’s already helped with his search for our ancestors, not to mention identifying all those predispositions for diseases and such. (I’m not being paid to promote them or anything, by the way…I just think it’s a really cool service!)

    @Oscar: Yeah, not everyone goes to great lengths. In all honesty, usually a Facebook or Google search is enough, and you don’t need to get into the advanced tactics.

    Thanks for voting! Getting a lot of involvement, and I really appreciate it!

  33. @Andrew: You’ve open Pandora’s Box here my friend :) Thanks for the link! I signed up and am figuring out how useful it is, now.

    @Bezhad: I must respectfully disagree with you, sir! My last relationship, which was quite a lovely one, started online (we met on a free dating site, in fact), and though the majority of people on those sites might use the tactics you describe (i.e. have no e-game), there are many people who are just looking to make a connection online which can then be transferred over to the real world, where you can then go about the ‘normal’ process, seeing all the body language, facial expressions, etc. I would recommend online dating to everyone…more and more it’s professionals of all ages who are sick of the same old bar/club scene or who simply don’t have time to go out and meet new people in their day-to-day.

    @Lillian: Isn’t it wonderful living in the future? Now where are those flying cars we were promised?

    @’Nette: Absolutely. The less I know, the more uncomfortable I feel. Why feel uncomfortable? Life’s too short.

    @Sebastian: Thanks for the comment, Sebastian. I agree that in-person communication is ideal, but 1) that’s not always possible, and 2) I would say that the even more ideal ideal is to have a conversation in person after already knowing something about them from the Internet. Even if it is a bit sterile (not always the case) or biased (okay, usually the case), you can learn as much from that as anything else. It may be that it takes spending more time online to pick up on those intricacies (the same way it takes some experience talking to people in real life to be able to pick up on the full spectrum of those intricacies) but my thought is that denying yourself any piece of available information is a handicap.

    Then again, I spend a significant part of my time online, so I might be biased :)

    The 23andMe service is really cool and definitely worth it. My family got it for my father (who is a genealogy enthusiast) and it’s already helped with his search for our ancestors, not to mention identifying all those predispositions for diseases and such. (I’m not being paid to promote them or anything, by the way…I just think it’s a really cool service!)

    @Oscar: Yeah, not everyone goes to great lengths. In all honesty, usually a Facebook or Google search is enough, and you don’t need to get into the advanced tactics.

    Thanks for voting! Getting a lot of involvement, and I really appreciate it!

  34. @Andrew: You’ve open Pandora’s Box here my friend :) Thanks for the link! I signed up and am figuring out how useful it is, now.

    @Bezhad: I must respectfully disagree with you, sir! My last relationship, which was quite a lovely one, started online (we met on a free dating site, in fact), and though the majority of people on those sites might use the tactics you describe (i.e. have no e-game), there are many people who are just looking to make a connection online which can then be transferred over to the real world, where you can then go about the ‘normal’ process, seeing all the body language, facial expressions, etc. I would recommend online dating to everyone…more and more it’s professionals of all ages who are sick of the same old bar/club scene or who simply don’t have time to go out and meet new people in their day-to-day.

    @Lillian: Isn’t it wonderful living in the future? Now where are those flying cars we were promised?

    @’Nette: Absolutely. The less I know, the more uncomfortable I feel. Why feel uncomfortable? Life’s too short.

    @Sebastian: Thanks for the comment, Sebastian. I agree that in-person communication is ideal, but 1) that’s not always possible, and 2) I would say that the even more ideal ideal is to have a conversation in person after already knowing something about them from the Internet. Even if it is a bit sterile (not always the case) or biased (okay, usually the case), you can learn as much from that as anything else. It may be that it takes spending more time online to pick up on those intricacies (the same way it takes some experience talking to people in real life to be able to pick up on the full spectrum of those intricacies) but my thought is that denying yourself any piece of available information is a handicap.

    Then again, I spend a significant part of my time online, so I might be biased :)

    The 23andMe service is really cool and definitely worth it. My family got it for my father (who is a genealogy enthusiast) and it’s already helped with his search for our ancestors, not to mention identifying all those predispositions for diseases and such. (I’m not being paid to promote them or anything, by the way…I just think it’s a really cool service!)

    @Oscar: Yeah, not everyone goes to great lengths. In all honesty, usually a Facebook or Google search is enough, and you don’t need to get into the advanced tactics.

    Thanks for voting! Getting a lot of involvement, and I really appreciate it!

  35. I’m stalked all the time. On Twitter, my blog, Facebook. In fact I welcome more stalkers. As long as you don’t become extreme and begin stalking me in my home I mean… then I might have to get drastic and obtain restraining orders… get cops all involved… hire a bodyguard.. etc. And that would be a huge hassle for me, which in turn would just make me cranky. And trust me… you DON’T want to stalk me when I’m cranky! ;)

    Great blog Colin, and loved this post.

    Warm regards,
    C

  36. I’m stalked all the time. On Twitter, my blog, Facebook. In fact I welcome more stalkers. As long as you don’t become extreme and begin stalking me in my home I mean… then I might have to get drastic and obtain restraining orders… get cops all involved… hire a bodyguard.. etc. And that would be a huge hassle for me, which in turn would just make me cranky. And trust me… you DON’T want to stalk me when I’m cranky! ;)

    Great blog Colin, and loved this post.

    Warm regards,
    C

  37. I’m stalked all the time. On Twitter, my blog, Facebook. In fact I welcome more stalkers. As long as you don’t become extreme and begin stalking me in my home I mean… then I might have to get drastic and obtain restraining orders… get cops all involved… hire a bodyguard.. etc. And that would be a huge hassle for me, which in turn would just make me cranky. And trust me… you DON’T want to stalk me when I’m cranky! ;)

    Great blog Colin, and loved this post.

    Warm regards,
    C

  38. I wouldn’t say you’re stalking people Colin, you’re taking an interest!

    If somebody adds me on FB I’ll go through their page, if somebody does/has done something rather questionable, I will do a little investigating of my own. I don’t like surprises, there’ve been so many bad ones and I’d rather just have everything out in the open. It’s like when somebody says ” I need to talk to you about someth……uh, I’ll tell you later/Aw, never mind.” You have to tell me – and if you don’t, then I will find a way to get it out of you.

    I really hate not knowing!

  39. I wouldn’t say you’re stalking people Colin, you’re taking an interest!

    If somebody adds me on FB I’ll go through their page, if somebody does/has done something rather questionable, I will do a little investigating of my own. I don’t like surprises, there’ve been so many bad ones and I’d rather just have everything out in the open. It’s like when somebody says ” I need to talk to you about someth……uh, I’ll tell you later/Aw, never mind.” You have to tell me – and if you don’t, then I will find a way to get it out of you.

    I really hate not knowing!

  40. I wouldn’t say you’re stalking people Colin, you’re taking an interest!

    If somebody adds me on FB I’ll go through their page, if somebody does/has done something rather questionable, I will do a little investigating of my own. I don’t like surprises, there’ve been so many bad ones and I’d rather just have everything out in the open. It’s like when somebody says ” I need to talk to you about someth……uh, I’ll tell you later/Aw, never mind.” You have to tell me – and if you don’t, then I will find a way to get it out of you.

    I really hate not knowing!

  41. I wouldn’t say you’re stalking people Colin, you’re taking an interest!

    If somebody adds me on FB I’ll go through their page, if somebody does/has done something rather questionable, I will do a little investigating of my own. I don’t like surprises, there’ve been so many bad ones and I’d rather just have everything out in the open. It’s like when somebody says ” I need to talk to you about someth……uh, I’ll tell you later/Aw, never mind.” You have to tell me – and if you don’t, then I will find a way to get it out of you.

    I really hate not knowing!

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