You’ll Never Be Philosophically Fulfilled (and That’s Okay)

 

Walking the Walk

In life you’ll come across many people who are adept at talking the talk, but don’t even own the right shoes to walking the walk. These people set their standards very high but in almost every case fail to measure up to their own standards.

This is especially true for lifestyle designers, partially because we set our standards very, very high, and partially because our philosophies tend to change fairly dramatically with great frequency.

I personally can remember very clearly a dozen or so major parallax shifts, after which my life seemed fundamentally different and I saw the world through completely different eyes.

What Others Say

I know I’m not alone in this, too. The other day I asked the folks following me on Twitter “Do you live your philosophy” Some replies included:

J.D. Bentley from Wage Slave Rebel said “I’m trying to 1. Finish developing my philosophy and 2. implement it.” (Mike Wilson from The Health Freak Blog concurred).

Nate D. from The Way That You Wander said “I do the best I can, my philosophy is still being formed I guess.”

Carlos Miceli from OwlSparks said “I try. But even we fail at our own philosophy sometimes. We’re that imperfect.”

Stephanie Yoder from Twenty-Something Travel said “I try very hard to every single day!”

Crystal Silver, of the aptly-named CrystalSilver.com, said “Headed in that direction. Working the plan. Some final steps are forthcoming.”

Nathan House from This Is Where I’m At said “Good question. It’s a mixed bag. My hope is to live life a little more purposefully. Sometimes that happens, sometimes not.”

As you can see from this sampling of (ambitious) respondents, very few people, especially of the lifestyle design sub-genre, believe that they are at the top of their game philosophically. And this is a good thing, because despite the semi-guru stance that most of us are forced to take on certain issues, in reality we’re just as confused and alone in the dark as anyone else; we just tend to write about it more (and use more lists!).

Can It Be Done?

I can’t help but wonder if it’s even possible for someone to reach full philosophical fulfillment and to not be full of shit. Many people claim this stature, but I think anyone who claims to have reached it has most likely hit a plateau…a philosophical block. If you take a look at some of the great philosophers of the past — Neizche, Kant, Freud, Beauvoir — they all have some really extraordinary ideas, but many of their masterworks cease to be fully relevant with the passing of time.

To me this indicates that, even though they were at the top of their game in their own day, if their remarkable ideas could degrade so quickly, how can they possibly be considered complete? This is not to say that there isn’t anything of value in their work – the opposite, actually! – but as a ‘final’ philosophy to rule all philosophies, none of their ideas measure up. I obviously can’t know this for sure, but I would imagine that most of them continued pondering and scribbling away until their dying breath, fully aware of the impending obsolescence of their life’s work and unable to seal all the gaps and paint over the plaster.

What’s the Point?

Which brings me to my next point: if any philosophy is doomed to be perpetually incomplete, why even indulge in them at all?

I can’t answer for everyone, but for me it’s a matter of determining my personal morality and purpose. Ever since I dropped religion in my mid-teens, I felt an overwhelming sense of responsibility. Before, I had the comforting warmth of set rules and regulations which I could follow, and if I did so I would suffer few negative consequences (or so the story was told). After that insulation was pulled away, however, I was forced to really take stock and figure out what made sense to me.

How I would treat my fellow human beings?

How I would address the unknown?

How I would operate in the business world?

How I would treat the planet?

And on and on and on. It’s a lot to think about.

The more I learn about the world and the people in it, though, the more I feel the need to refine the notions I’ve already come up with, and with each clarification I feel better about what I know.

In the Real World

As time goes on I’m making more of an effort to turn my philosophies into practical applications, because I figure that knowing something seems right is fine and dandy, but actually doing something about it is better. This has already resulted in a lot of strange looks and comments under the breath from people who don’t understand my latest attempts to become more minimalistic or my approaches to relationships or my views on the business world, but it makes me feel more complete.

So even knowing there is no end to the journey, I feel like making a difference in my own way is a sort of biological imperative in that if my ideas are passed on and are able to reproduce and evolve over time, they will be like my children and my time here will have been worth more than its intrinsic value.

It’s up to you to determine the purpose of your philosophical journey, but look at the bright side: since it’s your philosophy, whatever you come up with, you’re right.

What Say You?

What are some aspects of your personal philosophy? Do you agree that there can’t be an end to the philosophical process? How do you cope with the self-exploration growing pains? Tell your story in the comments below!

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58 comments

  1. Having a personal philosophy at all is vital to anyone not living the ‘conventional lifestyle’ and what you said about the philosophies of lifestyle designers in particular constantly changing and evolving hits on what it means to establish a new path. The struggle to design an philosophy to follow is a difficult one at best, but to design one that fits in all circumstances? To design one that can (and should?) be adhered to in the face of history or established norms? That is an undertaking indeed.

    You, among all people that I know, have committed yourself to fully living out a personal philosophy that you’ve designed. Perfect? No. But easily the closest I’ve met. Regardless of what other people say, or the weird looks other people give you, or even what I may think about your philosophy from time to time, your (stubborn? relentless?) adherence to your personal philosophy is inspiring.

    Fortunately for you and most people around you, yours is pretty logical. It just has to be examined as such and most of it starts to fall into place.

    This comment is rivaling your post in length. Anyway, this was thought-provoking read as I’ve been questioning my own personal philosophy and whether it’s time for an overhaul the past week or so.

  2. Having a personal philosophy at all is vital to anyone not living the ‘conventional lifestyle’ and what you said about the philosophies of lifestyle designers in particular constantly changing and evolving hits on what it means to establish a new path. The struggle to design an philosophy to follow is a difficult one at best, but to design one that fits in all circumstances? To design one that can (and should?) be adhered to in the face of history or established norms? That is an undertaking indeed.

    You, among all people that I know, have committed yourself to fully living out a personal philosophy that you’ve designed. Perfect? No. But easily the closest I’ve met. Regardless of what other people say, or the weird looks other people give you, or even what I may think about your philosophy from time to time, your (stubborn? relentless?) adherence to your personal philosophy is inspiring.

    Fortunately for you and most people around you, yours is pretty logical. It just has to be examined as such and most of it starts to fall into place.

    This comment is rivaling your post in length. Anyway, this was thought-provoking read as I’ve been questioning my own personal philosophy and whether it’s time for an overhaul the past week or so.

  3. Having a personal philosophy at all is vital to anyone not living the ‘conventional lifestyle’ and what you said about the philosophies of lifestyle designers in particular constantly changing and evolving hits on what it means to establish a new path. The struggle to design an philosophy to follow is a difficult one at best, but to design one that fits in all circumstances? To design one that can (and should?) be adhered to in the face of history or established norms? That is an undertaking indeed.

    You, among all people that I know, have committed yourself to fully living out a personal philosophy that you’ve designed. Perfect? No. But easily the closest I’ve met. Regardless of what other people say, or the weird looks other people give you, or even what I may think about your philosophy from time to time, your (stubborn? relentless?) adherence to your personal philosophy is inspiring.

    Fortunately for you and most people around you, yours is pretty logical. It just has to be examined as such and most of it starts to fall into place.

    This comment is rivaling your post in length. Anyway, this was thought-provoking read as I’ve been questioning my own personal philosophy and whether it’s time for an overhaul the past week or so.

  4. “This is especially true for lifestyle designers, partially because we set our standards very, very high, and partially because our philosophies tend to change fairly dramatically with great frequency.”

    You’re absolutely right – I’d like to think that rapidly evolving philosophies are an indicator of heading in the right direction. By searching, shifting, and tweaking our lives, we become better poised to hone in on a positive, world-changing, fruitful philosophy. Even if we aren’t entirely satisfied, that’s OK.

    Personally, I’m striving for 80% fulfillment :)

  5. “This is especially true for lifestyle designers, partially because we set our standards very, very high, and partially because our philosophies tend to change fairly dramatically with great frequency.”

    You’re absolutely right – I’d like to think that rapidly evolving philosophies are an indicator of heading in the right direction. By searching, shifting, and tweaking our lives, we become better poised to hone in on a positive, world-changing, fruitful philosophy. Even if we aren’t entirely satisfied, that’s OK.

    Personally, I’m striving for 80% fulfillment :)

  6. “This is especially true for lifestyle designers, partially because we set our standards very, very high, and partially because our philosophies tend to change fairly dramatically with great frequency.”

    You’re absolutely right – I’d like to think that rapidly evolving philosophies are an indicator of heading in the right direction. By searching, shifting, and tweaking our lives, we become better poised to hone in on a positive, world-changing, fruitful philosophy. Even if we aren’t entirely satisfied, that’s OK.

    Personally, I’m striving for 80% fulfillment :)

  7. “This is especially true for lifestyle designers, partially because we set our standards very, very high, and partially because our philosophies tend to change fairly dramatically with great frequency.”

    You’re absolutely right – I’d like to think that rapidly evolving philosophies are an indicator of heading in the right direction. By searching, shifting, and tweaking our lives, we become better poised to hone in on a positive, world-changing, fruitful philosophy. Even if we aren’t entirely satisfied, that’s OK.

    Personally, I’m striving for 80% fulfillment :)

  8. My personal philosophy is extremely simple. “Enjoy all the things in life that bring you pleasure while also trying to add value to other people’s lives.”

  9. My personal philosophy is extremely simple. “Enjoy all the things in life that bring you pleasure while also trying to add value to other people’s lives.”

  10. My personal philosophy is extremely simple. “Enjoy all the things in life that bring you pleasure while also trying to add value to other people’s lives.”

  11. My personal philosophy is extremely simple. “Enjoy all the things in life that bring you pleasure while also trying to add value to other people’s lives.”

  12. Wow. This is one of the best posts I’ve read in a while, anywhere. I had a feeling that those tweets were going to make it into a blog post somewhere along the line!

    In short, there is no end to the philosophical process. I know exactly what you mean when you wrote that you remember experiencing “a dozen or so major parallax shifts.” That is so dead on to what I have experienced as well.

    I am religious, and I take my faith pretty seriously, but I’m also constantly questioning what I’m told in regards to my religion. If I don’t, I just feel like I’m settling. I don’t like to follow rules just for the sake of following them, I need to know the reason behind them. I hope that makes at least a little sense :-)

    Awesome post Colin!

  13. Wow. This is one of the best posts I’ve read in a while, anywhere. I had a feeling that those tweets were going to make it into a blog post somewhere along the line!

    In short, there is no end to the philosophical process. I know exactly what you mean when you wrote that you remember experiencing “a dozen or so major parallax shifts.” That is so dead on to what I have experienced as well.

    I am religious, and I take my faith pretty seriously, but I’m also constantly questioning what I’m told in regards to my religion. If I don’t, I just feel like I’m settling. I don’t like to follow rules just for the sake of following them, I need to know the reason behind them. I hope that makes at least a little sense :-)

    Awesome post Colin!

  14. Wow. This is one of the best posts I’ve read in a while, anywhere. I had a feeling that those tweets were going to make it into a blog post somewhere along the line!

    In short, there is no end to the philosophical process. I know exactly what you mean when you wrote that you remember experiencing “a dozen or so major parallax shifts.” That is so dead on to what I have experienced as well.

    I am religious, and I take my faith pretty seriously, but I’m also constantly questioning what I’m told in regards to my religion. If I don’t, I just feel like I’m settling. I don’t like to follow rules just for the sake of following them, I need to know the reason behind them. I hope that makes at least a little sense :-)

    Awesome post Colin!

  15. Wow. This is one of the best posts I’ve read in a while, anywhere. I had a feeling that those tweets were going to make it into a blog post somewhere along the line!

    In short, there is no end to the philosophical process. I know exactly what you mean when you wrote that you remember experiencing “a dozen or so major parallax shifts.” That is so dead on to what I have experienced as well.

    I am religious, and I take my faith pretty seriously, but I’m also constantly questioning what I’m told in regards to my religion. If I don’t, I just feel like I’m settling. I don’t like to follow rules just for the sake of following them, I need to know the reason behind them. I hope that makes at least a little sense :-)

    Awesome post Colin!

  16. Wow thanks for including me!

    I think that finding, living and redefining your personal philosophy is an ongoing process that you do your entire life. The way you live your life and your outlook on the world SHOULD be evolving throughout your life- it’s called personal growth.

  17. Wow thanks for including me!

    I think that finding, living and redefining your personal philosophy is an ongoing process that you do your entire life. The way you live your life and your outlook on the world SHOULD be evolving throughout your life- it’s called personal growth.

  18. Wow thanks for including me!

    I think that finding, living and redefining your personal philosophy is an ongoing process that you do your entire life. The way you live your life and your outlook on the world SHOULD be evolving throughout your life- it’s called personal growth.

  19. Wow thanks for including me!

    I think that finding, living and redefining your personal philosophy is an ongoing process that you do your entire life. The way you live your life and your outlook on the world SHOULD be evolving throughout your life- it’s called personal growth.

  20. Is my personal philosophy what I’m actually living or what I want it to be? I want it to be ‘Have a good time, all the time’. Not always the case I’m afraid but getting there slowly.

    BTW, I take issue with the idea that Nietzsche is becoming less relevant. For example a lot of his writing was specifically about determining your own values and not looking to others for direction on how to live life.

  21. Is my personal philosophy what I’m actually living or what I want it to be? I want it to be ‘Have a good time, all the time’. Not always the case I’m afraid but getting there slowly.

    BTW, I take issue with the idea that Nietzsche is becoming less relevant. For example a lot of his writing was specifically about determining your own values and not looking to others for direction on how to live life.

  22. Is my personal philosophy what I’m actually living or what I want it to be? I want it to be ‘Have a good time, all the time’. Not always the case I’m afraid but getting there slowly.

    BTW, I take issue with the idea that Nietzsche is becoming less relevant. For example a lot of his writing was specifically about determining your own values and not looking to others for direction on how to live life.

  23. Is my personal philosophy what I’m actually living or what I want it to be? I want it to be ‘Have a good time, all the time’. Not always the case I’m afraid but getting there slowly.

    BTW, I take issue with the idea that Nietzsche is becoming less relevant. For example a lot of his writing was specifically about determining your own values and not looking to others for direction on how to live life.

  24. Hmmm, what is my personal philosophy in life? To be happy. It really is that simple. But to go a bit deeper, it is to sustain happiness in simplicity, reality, and not “things”.

    I think the secret to being happy is to accept unhappiness. :)

    Cheers,
    Dayne

  25. Hmmm, what is my personal philosophy in life? To be happy. It really is that simple. But to go a bit deeper, it is to sustain happiness in simplicity, reality, and not “things”.

    I think the secret to being happy is to accept unhappiness. :)

    Cheers,
    Dayne

  26. Hmmm, what is my personal philosophy in life? To be happy. It really is that simple. But to go a bit deeper, it is to sustain happiness in simplicity, reality, and not “things”.

    I think the secret to being happy is to accept unhappiness. :)

    Cheers,
    Dayne

  27. Hmmm, what is my personal philosophy in life? To be happy. It really is that simple. But to go a bit deeper, it is to sustain happiness in simplicity, reality, and not “things”.

    I think the secret to being happy is to accept unhappiness. :)

    Cheers,
    Dayne

  28. Nice post, Colin. I’m not sure I have ever sat down and consciously thought about my personal philosophy. I would have to go with NomadicNeil and say it’s my life goal to be happy… but I’m not so sure that’s a philosophy. I think I am more of a do-er and rather than thinking about how I want my life to be and what rules I want to live by, I just do it without too much thought. This might be because I have defined my philosophy already subconsciously or something. Who knows. I’m happy, so it must be working, whatever ‘it’ is!

  29. Nice post, Colin. I’m not sure I have ever sat down and consciously thought about my personal philosophy. I would have to go with NomadicNeil and say it’s my life goal to be happy… but I’m not so sure that’s a philosophy. I think I am more of a do-er and rather than thinking about how I want my life to be and what rules I want to live by, I just do it without too much thought. This might be because I have defined my philosophy already subconsciously or something. Who knows. I’m happy, so it must be working, whatever ‘it’ is!

  30. Nice post, Colin. I’m not sure I have ever sat down and consciously thought about my personal philosophy. I would have to go with NomadicNeil and say it’s my life goal to be happy… but I’m not so sure that’s a philosophy. I think I am more of a do-er and rather than thinking about how I want my life to be and what rules I want to live by, I just do it without too much thought. This might be because I have defined my philosophy already subconsciously or something. Who knows. I’m happy, so it must be working, whatever ‘it’ is!

  31. Nice post, Colin. I’m not sure I have ever sat down and consciously thought about my personal philosophy. I would have to go with NomadicNeil and say it’s my life goal to be happy… but I’m not so sure that’s a philosophy. I think I am more of a do-er and rather than thinking about how I want my life to be and what rules I want to live by, I just do it without too much thought. This might be because I have defined my philosophy already subconsciously or something. Who knows. I’m happy, so it must be working, whatever ‘it’ is!

  32. @Kristin: Hey thanks! I agree, too, that developing a philosophy that works more than it doesn’t is tough! I do what I can, for sure, but even with the amount of focus I put into it I frequently run into hazy gray-zones.
    @Alan: 80% is definitely something worth striving for! And it’s good to remember that Darwin didn’t say that it’s the strongest that survive, but those most adaptable to change. Staying adaptable keeps us strong.
    @Gordie: I like it! Elegant in its simplicity.
    @Nate: Wow, thanks for the compliment, Nate! Really glad you enjoyed the post! It’s good to hear, too, that you are constantly questioning and checking the premises for what you believe and act upon. Too many people use religion as an excuse to justify the bad things they do and live an unexplored life, and you, sir, are doing a remarkable job at breaking that mold.
    @Stephanie: Absolutely! Personal growth! Woo!
    @NomadicNeil: In my opinion, your personal philosophy is what you live by, but many people would disagree. I think, though, that if you’re not living it, what you have is an idea, not a philosophy. As for Nietzsche, I’ve gotten a lot from his work, and many of my philosophical ideas are directly derived from his ideas, but at the same time some of his ideas about science (matter, specifically) and his treatment of morality (objective perception) don’t ring as true as they did in his day (though not by any fault of his own…we’ve simply learned a lot more about the world since then, and no doubt his philosophies would have changed with the sciences, were he alive to posit further).
    @Dayne: Amen :) Very Stoic of you!
    @Kirsty: Whether consciously or subconsciously, it’s good that you’re living according to what you believe!

    Thanks for the comments everyone!

  33. @Kristin: Hey thanks! I agree, too, that developing a philosophy that works more than it doesn’t is tough! I do what I can, for sure, but even with the amount of focus I put into it I frequently run into hazy gray-zones.
    @Alan: 80% is definitely something worth striving for! And it’s good to remember that Darwin didn’t say that it’s the strongest that survive, but those most adaptable to change. Staying adaptable keeps us strong.
    @Gordie: I like it! Elegant in its simplicity.
    @Nate: Wow, thanks for the compliment, Nate! Really glad you enjoyed the post! It’s good to hear, too, that you are constantly questioning and checking the premises for what you believe and act upon. Too many people use religion as an excuse to justify the bad things they do and live an unexplored life, and you, sir, are doing a remarkable job at breaking that mold.
    @Stephanie: Absolutely! Personal growth! Woo!
    @NomadicNeil: In my opinion, your personal philosophy is what you live by, but many people would disagree. I think, though, that if you’re not living it, what you have is an idea, not a philosophy. As for Nietzsche, I’ve gotten a lot from his work, and many of my philosophical ideas are directly derived from his ideas, but at the same time some of his ideas about science (matter, specifically) and his treatment of morality (objective perception) don’t ring as true as they did in his day (though not by any fault of his own…we’ve simply learned a lot more about the world since then, and no doubt his philosophies would have changed with the sciences, were he alive to posit further).
    @Dayne: Amen :) Very Stoic of you!
    @Kirsty: Whether consciously or subconsciously, it’s good that you’re living according to what you believe!

    Thanks for the comments everyone!

  34. @Kristin: Hey thanks! I agree, too, that developing a philosophy that works more than it doesn’t is tough! I do what I can, for sure, but even with the amount of focus I put into it I frequently run into hazy gray-zones.
    @Alan: 80% is definitely something worth striving for! And it’s good to remember that Darwin didn’t say that it’s the strongest that survive, but those most adaptable to change. Staying adaptable keeps us strong.
    @Gordie: I like it! Elegant in its simplicity.
    @Nate: Wow, thanks for the compliment, Nate! Really glad you enjoyed the post! It’s good to hear, too, that you are constantly questioning and checking the premises for what you believe and act upon. Too many people use religion as an excuse to justify the bad things they do and live an unexplored life, and you, sir, are doing a remarkable job at breaking that mold.
    @Stephanie: Absolutely! Personal growth! Woo!
    @NomadicNeil: In my opinion, your personal philosophy is what you live by, but many people would disagree. I think, though, that if you’re not living it, what you have is an idea, not a philosophy. As for Nietzsche, I’ve gotten a lot from his work, and many of my philosophical ideas are directly derived from his ideas, but at the same time some of his ideas about science (matter, specifically) and his treatment of morality (objective perception) don’t ring as true as they did in his day (though not by any fault of his own…we’ve simply learned a lot more about the world since then, and no doubt his philosophies would have changed with the sciences, were he alive to posit further).
    @Dayne: Amen :) Very Stoic of you!
    @Kirsty: Whether consciously or subconsciously, it’s good that you’re living according to what you believe!

    Thanks for the comments everyone!

  35. @Kristin: Hey thanks! I agree, too, that developing a philosophy that works more than it doesn’t is tough! I do what I can, for sure, but even with the amount of focus I put into it I frequently run into hazy gray-zones.
    @Alan: 80% is definitely something worth striving for! And it’s good to remember that Darwin didn’t say that it’s the strongest that survive, but those most adaptable to change. Staying adaptable keeps us strong.
    @Gordie: I like it! Elegant in its simplicity.
    @Nate: Wow, thanks for the compliment, Nate! Really glad you enjoyed the post! It’s good to hear, too, that you are constantly questioning and checking the premises for what you believe and act upon. Too many people use religion as an excuse to justify the bad things they do and live an unexplored life, and you, sir, are doing a remarkable job at breaking that mold.
    @Stephanie: Absolutely! Personal growth! Woo!
    @NomadicNeil: In my opinion, your personal philosophy is what you live by, but many people would disagree. I think, though, that if you’re not living it, what you have is an idea, not a philosophy. As for Nietzsche, I’ve gotten a lot from his work, and many of my philosophical ideas are directly derived from his ideas, but at the same time some of his ideas about science (matter, specifically) and his treatment of morality (objective perception) don’t ring as true as they did in his day (though not by any fault of his own…we’ve simply learned a lot more about the world since then, and no doubt his philosophies would have changed with the sciences, were he alive to posit further).
    @Dayne: Amen :) Very Stoic of you!
    @Kirsty: Whether consciously or subconsciously, it’s good that you’re living according to what you believe!

    Thanks for the comments everyone!

  36. I think the best part about life is that there is always something to strive towards. The problem with a lot of people is that they settle. Why settle? Life is full of great opportunities that we are going to fail at and succeed at. We will never be perfect or achieve perfection, but the journey is well worth it.

    Dave
    LifeExcursion

  37. I think the best part about life is that there is always something to strive towards. The problem with a lot of people is that they settle. Why settle? Life is full of great opportunities that we are going to fail at and succeed at. We will never be perfect or achieve perfection, but the journey is well worth it.

    Dave
    LifeExcursion

  38. I think the best part about life is that there is always something to strive towards. The problem with a lot of people is that they settle. Why settle? Life is full of great opportunities that we are going to fail at and succeed at. We will never be perfect or achieve perfection, but the journey is well worth it.

    Dave
    LifeExcursion

  39. I think the best part about life is that there is always something to strive towards. The problem with a lot of people is that they settle. Why settle? Life is full of great opportunities that we are going to fail at and succeed at. We will never be perfect or achieve perfection, but the journey is well worth it.

    Dave
    LifeExcursion

  40. I like this post. I’d never really thought about it from this perspective before. Our personal philosophies change regularly enough it’s hard to take ourselves seriously sometimes I think.

    My personal philosophy is a bit of a cop out though, it’s about what not to do rather than what to do:

    “There is no one right way to live” – daniel quinn.

    It just means anything goes as long as it works. And don’t delude yourself into thinking everyone should live like you do so just let people be.

  41. I like this post. I’d never really thought about it from this perspective before. Our personal philosophies change regularly enough it’s hard to take ourselves seriously sometimes I think.

    My personal philosophy is a bit of a cop out though, it’s about what not to do rather than what to do:

    “There is no one right way to live” – daniel quinn.

    It just means anything goes as long as it works. And don’t delude yourself into thinking everyone should live like you do so just let people be.

  42. I like this post. I’d never really thought about it from this perspective before. Our personal philosophies change regularly enough it’s hard to take ourselves seriously sometimes I think.

    My personal philosophy is a bit of a cop out though, it’s about what not to do rather than what to do:

    “There is no one right way to live” – daniel quinn.

    It just means anything goes as long as it works. And don’t delude yourself into thinking everyone should live like you do so just let people be.

  43. Thanks for your thoughts. You’re spot on when you talk about dropping religion or any other pre-determined moral code. It is a tremendous responsibility and the price of freedom.

    At 41, I’m coming to understand that consistency really is the hobgoblin of small minds…. and that there’s nothing wrong with me just because I haven’t “figured it out.”

    Cheers!

  44. Thanks for your thoughts. You’re spot on when you talk about dropping religion or any other pre-determined moral code. It is a tremendous responsibility and the price of freedom.

    At 41, I’m coming to understand that consistency really is the hobgoblin of small minds…. and that there’s nothing wrong with me just because I haven’t “figured it out.”

    Cheers!

  45. Thanks for your thoughts. You’re spot on when you talk about dropping religion or any other pre-determined moral code. It is a tremendous responsibility and the price of freedom.

    At 41, I’m coming to understand that consistency really is the hobgoblin of small minds…. and that there’s nothing wrong with me just because I haven’t “figured it out.”

    Cheers!

  46. I felt fulfilled after reading Camus honestly. Concretely existing Sisyphean individuals are what continue to inspire my existence.

  47. I felt fulfilled after reading Camus honestly. Concretely existing Sisyphean individuals are what continue to inspire my existence.

  48. I felt fulfilled after reading Camus honestly. Concretely existing Sisyphean individuals are what continue to inspire my existence.

  49. I felt fulfilled after reading Camus honestly. Concretely existing Sisyphean individuals are what continue to inspire my existence.

  50. Currently reading a version of Spinoza by Deleuze. There are some pretty interesting thoughts there, all of them pertinent and timeless. I do not agree with the argument that great ideas decay with the pass of time, or they can’t be called that great then :)

    I think the only philosophy that actually applies for life is that we live it :)

  51. Currently reading a version of Spinoza by Deleuze. There are some pretty interesting thoughts there, all of them pertinent and timeless. I do not agree with the argument that great ideas decay with the pass of time, or they can’t be called that great then :)

    I think the only philosophy that actually applies for life is that we live it :)

  52. Currently reading a version of Spinoza by Deleuze. There are some pretty interesting thoughts there, all of them pertinent and timeless. I do not agree with the argument that great ideas decay with the pass of time, or they can’t be called that great then :)

    I think the only philosophy that actually applies for life is that we live it :)

  53. It’s so funny you wrote this Colin because I have been battling with growing pains. Forcing myself into action to fulfill my own personal philosophies has completely shattered those philosophies. I feel like life is all about experimentation. And like you said if a life philosophy is an experiment is it even worth trying. I absolutely say hell yes! Now that I am back from the states for a bit to save money for my next big adventure, I think it’s important to evaluate what does or doesn’t work. Keep refining what works for you. Like you said life is every evolving. We kid ourselves in thinking we have some sort of real understanding of what is the best way to live. There is no best way, just whatever works for you at that given moment in time. Great analysis!

  54. It’s so funny you wrote this Colin because I have been battling with growing pains. Forcing myself into action to fulfill my own personal philosophies has completely shattered those philosophies. I feel like life is all about experimentation. And like you said if a life philosophy is an experiment is it even worth trying. I absolutely say hell yes! Now that I am back from the states for a bit to save money for my next big adventure, I think it’s important to evaluate what does or doesn’t work. Keep refining what works for you. Like you said life is every evolving. We kid ourselves in thinking we have some sort of real understanding of what is the best way to live. There is no best way, just whatever works for you at that given moment in time. Great analysis!

  55. Pingback: 7 Amazing Blogs About Simplicity

  56. Too bad you missed Spinoza. A philosopher who lived his philsophy to the core of his being and unlike Nietzsche, Spinoza wasn’t crazy.

  57. I see that this post is from awhile back but I will respond anyway. It’s funny that I ran across this since I was *just* blogging about lifestyle design and how it relates to students’ ambitions to go on to grad school.

    Facebook statuses are full of wonderful philosophical quotes that sound incredible in theory but how many people actually live up to them? I know I am guilty of it too. Just recently one came across my timeline that said, “If the first thing you’d do after hitting the lottery is quit your job, you need to quit today and start living your dreams.” That’s a paraphrase… it sounded much nicer and “like”-worthy than that.

    I liked the status myself and agree with the philosophy but how many people can very literally afford to “walk the talk? in this day and age? Me? I’m definitely working on it but I *know* I’m in the minority. People look at me as if I have two heads when I say I’m working on the side to build a scalable business so that I won’t “need” a job.

    Literally. Like I have two heads. As if it’s completely outside the realm of possibility. So from those reactions, I would argue that although I’m walking the talk but not completely there yet, these same people “liking” the philosophy aren’t even *doing anything* to work towards making the philosophy a reality. They’re still chained to their desks, living for the weekend, and instead of chasing their own jackpot, they’re wishing for a hope and a dream of actually hitting the Mega Millions.

  58. What I like about this, Colin, is that it seems you don’t accept people living blindly by a given religious philosophy or set of rules. Recently I’ve been intellectually wrestling with some who make their judgements of what is right or wrong purely on what their religion would say about the issue. That to me is lazy thinking (is it thinking at all?) Religion provides some sound frameworks for successful living for many people, however I suspect that upon closer inspection, for many its benefit is to provide a method of thinking and living so that they no longer need to feel responsible for their philosophical choices.

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