The Tests Who Think They Know Me

 

Dissing the Stars

I’ve always thought that horoscopes were kind of ridiculous.

Here you have a series of predictions, ostensibly that will apply to everyone, but there are only a dozen of them in total. This means that everyone on earth has been divided into 12 groups, and each person in a group will have a remarkably similar day.

Seems logical…on opposite day! Ha!

Not only that, but where do these ‘facts’ come from? My guess is there are some people who really buy the whole concept, who meticulously go over god-knows-what old documents and star maps to figure out what may happen and then they guess based on what they come up with, and then the other 99% of the industry consists of writers who have a talent for vagueness so that anything they write can be taken and twisted to fit what happened to almost anyone that day.

Knowing this, you can imagine my hesitation the first time I was to take the Meyers-Briggs personality test, which would supposedly tell quite a bit about my personality based on a few hundred questions that I would answer.

“Bring me my tin-foil hat,” I thought, “because I’ve just been accepted into the wacko-brigade.”

Much to my surprise, however, the test was actually pretty accurate.

My Personality in Letters

I was labeled and ENTJ, which is a somewhat rare combination of 4 different letters, each representing a different approach to the world (‘E’ stands for ‘extroverted,’N’ for ‘intuitive,’ ‘T’ for ‘thinking,’ ‘J’ for ‘judging,’ for example). The explanation offered of my personality type wasn’t exact, but close enough to make me nod my head while reading it, thinking ‘oh, so THAT’S why I do that.’

Then again, I have to think that many people wouldn’t have that same experience. For one, the number of traits only allows for 16 different personality types, and that isn’t many when you think of the scope and span of people out there.

Additionally, not everyone answers what they really feel on tests, hoping to come across as the kind of person they’d LIKE to be, manipulate the system or otherwise panic themselves into not even knowing how to respond. This can lead to inaccurate labeling.

My Personality in Numbers

But even if the test results may have been questionable, the Meyers-Briggs did give me the open-mind to accept a gift from a client and good friend of mine, Carol Segrave, who told me she wanted me to take something called the Birkman, which was supposedly something like the Meyers-Briggs but much more involved and expensive (when given and interpreted by a professional like Carol, anyway).

I told her I would.

The actual test was actually remarkably similar to the Meyers-Briggs, at least in the wording of the questions. There were definitely a whole lot more of them, though, and the results are much more extensive. I’m looking at 30+ pages of data on ME, and the way the numbers of calculated indicate that rather than shoving people into the category with the closest fit, this test actually gives you numerical stats as an individual, not a ‘type.’

All that being said, I’m not thrilled with all the results.

According to the Birkman, I’m a creative genius who excels in business – woohoo! – who doesn’t really need people and could be perfectly happy living a life in solitude with nothing but his books and a quiet place to read and create – wooho…oh…wait…what?

Cruelly Calculated Realities

Yup, that’s right, the Birkman was able to see all the hard work I’ve put in over the years, whereas the Meyers-Briggs merely saw who I am now.

Most most people don’t realize about me is that I’m a natural introvert, and that I’ve spent a whole lot of time building myself into the extrovert I am today. Not only that, but I wasn’t even born being into business; it’s something I picked up along the way, I knew that I wanted to be able to make changes in the world and I felt the best way to do so was to hurl myself into a position of influence where I would be respected and have the resources to accomplish what needed doing.

Sure, I have a few traits that have allowed me to thrive in the business world where others might not, but the fact remains that if I hadn’t worked my butt off, I wouldn’t be where I am now. I would probably be where I planned to be at this time in my life back in high school: drawing sketches of passersby for ramen money on the streets of a European city.

How glamorous (?).

Dealing with the Data

Exposing all this did more than allow me to ruminate on what could have been; it also gave me permission to accept the things about myself that have bugged me and work harder on the things that I want to improve upon.

For example, it’s not likely that I’ll ever get rid of my need for time alone. It doesn’t often hinder me, and with rare exception of people who I’ve lived with recently (sorry Kristin!), few people will ever see me REALLY needing space.

Having my traits, strengths and weaknesses laid out in front of me in over 30 pages of numbers, charts and graphs didn’t feel like a Kafakaesque-experience, but rather like a discussion with a trusted friend; the kind that isn’t afraid to flatter or be brutally honest about your faults…and that’s the best kind of friend there is.

What has been your experience with these kinds of personality tests? Did they seem accurate? Do you trust them? What did they reveal about you?

46 comments

  1. “opposite day” haha I haven’t heard that for years

    I think a strange phenomenon occurs with these tests – we can see ourselves reflected in the results no matter what they say, as…the more abstract the idea the more likely we are to come up with our own reasoning.

    For example “extrovert” sounds like a pretty specific term. But it can be defined on a sliding scale and the definition will differ from person to person. Its an abstract idea or “name”.

    I remember reading about this phenomenon in a book on persuasion science.

  2. “opposite day” haha I haven’t heard that for years

    I think a strange phenomenon occurs with these tests – we can see ourselves reflected in the results no matter what they say, as…the more abstract the idea the more likely we are to come up with our own reasoning.

    For example “extrovert” sounds like a pretty specific term. But it can be defined on a sliding scale and the definition will differ from person to person. Its an abstract idea or “name”.

    I remember reading about this phenomenon in a book on persuasion science.

  3. The problem is that these tests are necessarily subjective and depend so much on how you feel at the time you take the test and what you selectively remember as you take it that it ends up being more about how you like to see yourself/are feeling at that moment rather than how you ‘actually are’ (if, in fact, you actually are anything).

    A more accurate reading would come from something purely objective, like covert filming of all of your waking behavior over a medium to long period of time (like, say, a month), although my guess is that there would be absolutely no consistency to your behaviour that it would be impossible to nail down an accurate description of your fundamental ‘youness’.

    Also, I would suggest that we are all natural introverts.

    Our Amygdala makes us fearful of, well, everything but particularly any sort of public displays. Some people are lucky enough to get over it earlier than others. Some even learn to enjoy the adrenaline that comes from doing something that might get us laughed at (e.g. their behaviour is rewarded with sex or applause).

    These are the ‘natural extroverts’.

    Others don’t, for reasons also related to their environment (they are bullied or scolded often), and they become the ‘natural introverts’.

    Either could easily switch back to the other extreme based on a single event or series of events – a character arc, if you will.

    People have trouble figuring out who they are, and others – from horoscope writers to personality testers to advertisers – use this insecurity to their advantage.

  4. The problem is that these tests are necessarily subjective and depend so much on how you feel at the time you take the test and what you selectively remember as you take it that it ends up being more about how you like to see yourself/are feeling at that moment rather than how you ‘actually are’ (if, in fact, you actually are anything).

    A more accurate reading would come from something purely objective, like covert filming of all of your waking behavior over a medium to long period of time (like, say, a month), although my guess is that there would be absolutely no consistency to your behaviour that it would be impossible to nail down an accurate description of your fundamental ‘youness’.

    Also, I would suggest that we are all natural introverts.

    Our Amygdala makes us fearful of, well, everything but particularly any sort of public displays. Some people are lucky enough to get over it earlier than others. Some even learn to enjoy the adrenaline that comes from doing something that might get us laughed at (e.g. their behaviour is rewarded with sex or applause).

    These are the ‘natural extroverts’.

    Others don’t, for reasons also related to their environment (they are bullied or scolded often), and they become the ‘natural introverts’.

    Either could easily switch back to the other extreme based on a single event or series of events – a character arc, if you will.

    People have trouble figuring out who they are, and others – from horoscope writers to personality testers to advertisers – use this insecurity to their advantage.

  5. I have put a lot of thought into astrology actually. I had (and still have) that complaint about horoscopes. The problem is that horoscopes only take into account the sun sign. Even if you just include moon signs, the other sign considered the most ‘significant’, you get that there are 144 different groups of people who will all have remarkably similar days. At that point it almost becomes believable but if you include all seven classical planets then you get 35,831,808 different groups. On top of that there many other possible variables.

    I actually have a 7 page astrology report that was made for me at some point and it is remarkably accurate. It seems to be as accurate as the meyers-briggs, which I took in an intro to psychology class a2 years ago. I am also a ENTJ.

    I will be sure and check out the Birkman if the opportunity ever presents itself.

  6. I have put a lot of thought into astrology actually. I had (and still have) that complaint about horoscopes. The problem is that horoscopes only take into account the sun sign. Even if you just include moon signs, the other sign considered the most ‘significant’, you get that there are 144 different groups of people who will all have remarkably similar days. At that point it almost becomes believable but if you include all seven classical planets then you get 35,831,808 different groups. On top of that there many other possible variables.

    I actually have a 7 page astrology report that was made for me at some point and it is remarkably accurate. It seems to be as accurate as the meyers-briggs, which I took in an intro to psychology class a2 years ago. I am also a ENTJ.

    I will be sure and check out the Birkman if the opportunity ever presents itself.

  7. ENTP here. I find the Myers Briggs is fairly accurate. Horoscopes are dumb.

    And anyone can change their personality. Just like you did big C :)

  8. ENTP here. I find the Myers Briggs is fairly accurate. Horoscopes are dumb.

    And anyone can change their personality. Just like you did big C :)

  9. The problem with personality tests is that once you get your results, you start thinking of ways that your life could be interpreted through them. Privileging the hypothesis, in a way.

    You said: “the Birkman was able to see all the hard work I’ve put in over the years, whereas the Meyers-Briggs merely saw who I am now.” The other problem with taking most personality tests is that you start to fixate on who they say you are, instead of thinking about how you can change yourself for the better. You start to say, “Well, that’s just my personality, nothing I can do about it,” instead of “This may be out of my comfort zone, but let’s give it a shot anyway.”

    Just my $.02

  10. The problem with personality tests is that once you get your results, you start thinking of ways that your life could be interpreted through them. Privileging the hypothesis, in a way.

    You said: “the Birkman was able to see all the hard work I’ve put in over the years, whereas the Meyers-Briggs merely saw who I am now.” The other problem with taking most personality tests is that you start to fixate on who they say you are, instead of thinking about how you can change yourself for the better. You start to say, “Well, that’s just my personality, nothing I can do about it,” instead of “This may be out of my comfort zone, but let’s give it a shot anyway.”

    Just my $.02

  11. I’m not really fond of personality tests, so far most have been mostly inaccurate. And since I started my zen training, most show me as a blank slate.

    The latest one I made here at work, showed me as someone who doesn’t want to be involved in projects, that I didn’t want to lead a project and that I was totally happy without being involved with my coworkers. My boss was amazed since what he sees everyday is the total opposite.

    I may give a try to the tests that you made, who knows maybe I can learn something new. The do seem interesting and I do like to answer tests like those, I don’t really know why.

  12. I’m not really fond of personality tests, so far most have been mostly inaccurate. And since I started my zen training, most show me as a blank slate.

    The latest one I made here at work, showed me as someone who doesn’t want to be involved in projects, that I didn’t want to lead a project and that I was totally happy without being involved with my coworkers. My boss was amazed since what he sees everyday is the total opposite.

    I may give a try to the tests that you made, who knows maybe I can learn something new. The do seem interesting and I do like to answer tests like those, I don’t really know why.

  13. As a qualified MBTI facilitator/trainer, I can tell you that people love to answer questionnaires based on visions of who they’d prefer to be. I’ve had friends emerge from an MBTI session patting themselves on the back for testing as an Extrovert (“I’m a good salesman.”) or testing as an iNtuitive (“I’m a big picture person.”)

    When someone walks into one of those tools with biases like those, it’s going to be difficult to get to an honest result.

    The thing with the MBTI is that it’s about innate preferences, which according to the theory (and also my belief and experience) indicate behaviors that are more natural. You can work to build your abilities, but your preferences don’t change. The tool becomes even more powerful when you consider how you respond under stress. (And when people are under stress in most of their lives, imagine how difficult it is to unpack that!)

    When I tell people I’m an introvert, the usual reaction is, “I don’t believe it…you’re great with people.” Being an introvert doesn’t really have anything to do with being “good with people”, it’s about where you derive your energy. So even though I can be extroverted for hours while facilitating a large group or when socializing, I derive energy from being alone.

    And in the end, the MBTI is just a tool. People who lay everything at its altar (or the altar of any one tool, any one philosophy) are setting themselves up for eventual disappointment.

  14. As a qualified MBTI facilitator/trainer, I can tell you that people love to answer questionnaires based on visions of who they’d prefer to be. I’ve had friends emerge from an MBTI session patting themselves on the back for testing as an Extrovert (“I’m a good salesman.”) or testing as an iNtuitive (“I’m a big picture person.”)

    When someone walks into one of those tools with biases like those, it’s going to be difficult to get to an honest result.

    The thing with the MBTI is that it’s about innate preferences, which according to the theory (and also my belief and experience) indicate behaviors that are more natural. You can work to build your abilities, but your preferences don’t change. The tool becomes even more powerful when you consider how you respond under stress. (And when people are under stress in most of their lives, imagine how difficult it is to unpack that!)

    When I tell people I’m an introvert, the usual reaction is, “I don’t believe it…you’re great with people.” Being an introvert doesn’t really have anything to do with being “good with people”, it’s about where you derive your energy. So even though I can be extroverted for hours while facilitating a large group or when socializing, I derive energy from being alone.

    And in the end, the MBTI is just a tool. People who lay everything at its altar (or the altar of any one tool, any one philosophy) are setting themselves up for eventual disappointment.

  15. I first found out about the Myers Briggs test when I was around 25. I thought mine was fairly accurate at the time, haven’t checked it lately though. I am like you in that I’m also an introvert who has forced himself to be more of an extrovert. If I were to check it again now at 28 I would think the results would be very close despite some big changes Ive gone through. I think the test really determines who we are at the core so while it changes, it doesn’t as much as say our habits. I would think it takes some drastic changes to significantly change your results assuming you answered as honestly as possible. After learning about this I conjured up all kinds of conspiracy theories that maybe the government was purposely putting the right combination of a certain personality types in situations to ensure expected outcomes based on the situation.. for example putting an explosive personality type in a heated situation and watch the fun happen. Hey its close to controlling the future..As for Horoscopes don’t believe them.. but strangely I’ve notice loose similarities for people of each zodiac sign.. Aries always seem very proud to be an Aries and kinda free spirits, Scorpios and Taurus always seem a be bold seemingly fearless individuals? Just things I kinda picked up on.. but the more you look for something.. the more likely you’ll find it. And if these people believe in the persona that should accompany a particular zodiac I guess they’re more likely to see themselves in that way.. perception is reality.. here’s my $.025

  16. I first found out about the Myers Briggs test when I was around 25. I thought mine was fairly accurate at the time, haven’t checked it lately though. I am like you in that I’m also an introvert who has forced himself to be more of an extrovert. If I were to check it again now at 28 I would think the results would be very close despite some big changes Ive gone through. I think the test really determines who we are at the core so while it changes, it doesn’t as much as say our habits. I would think it takes some drastic changes to significantly change your results assuming you answered as honestly as possible. After learning about this I conjured up all kinds of conspiracy theories that maybe the government was purposely putting the right combination of a certain personality types in situations to ensure expected outcomes based on the situation.. for example putting an explosive personality type in a heated situation and watch the fun happen. Hey its close to controlling the future..As for Horoscopes don’t believe them.. but strangely I’ve notice loose similarities for people of each zodiac sign.. Aries always seem very proud to be an Aries and kinda free spirits, Scorpios and Taurus always seem a be bold seemingly fearless individuals? Just things I kinda picked up on.. but the more you look for something.. the more likely you’ll find it. And if these people believe in the persona that should accompany a particular zodiac I guess they’re more likely to see themselves in that way.. perception is reality.. here’s my $.025

  17. If I recall correctly, and my memory is near perfection, so that’s likely, I was the one who fought for separate rooms when we moved in together. Just saying. :P

    Also, I have to agree that I was remarkably shocked at the data that test gave you! There were parts of your personality that took me a year of living with you to ever start to see. People still don’t believe me when I say you have emotions (don’t worry, I tell them I’m joking after, so you can save face….Robot).

    I still disagree with my Meyers Briggs test. But that might be that I’ve tested differently every time I’ve taken it. So maybe that’s pretty accurate…I don’t tend to stay the same for very long.

  18. If I recall correctly, and my memory is near perfection, so that’s likely, I was the one who fought for separate rooms when we moved in together. Just saying. :P

    Also, I have to agree that I was remarkably shocked at the data that test gave you! There were parts of your personality that took me a year of living with you to ever start to see. People still don’t believe me when I say you have emotions (don’t worry, I tell them I’m joking after, so you can save face….Robot).

    I still disagree with my Meyers Briggs test. But that might be that I’ve tested differently every time I’ve taken it. So maybe that’s pretty accurate…I don’t tend to stay the same for very long.

  19. We’re doing this in my MBA program right now (actually, I’m writing a paper about it this minute). The results ARE striking (“oh yeah, THAT’s why I do that), but more than ever, the opportunity for me to realize my strengths, weaknesses, and create a strategic plan for improving communication and leadership is the takeaway. I also shared the kneejerk “No one’s gonna tell ME who I am” moment, but once past that, it’s helping some true self-realization and adaptation.

  20. We’re doing this in my MBA program right now (actually, I’m writing a paper about it this minute). The results ARE striking (“oh yeah, THAT’s why I do that), but more than ever, the opportunity for me to realize my strengths, weaknesses, and create a strategic plan for improving communication and leadership is the takeaway. I also shared the kneejerk “No one’s gonna tell ME who I am” moment, but once past that, it’s helping some true self-realization and adaptation.

  21. I took the Meyers-Briggs a while back, and it was pretty accurate. By accurate I mean how I was then. Like you I’ve changed dramatically over the last few years.

    This was a really interesting idea for a post. What I got out of it the most is that there is so much power in the desire to improve yourself. While a lot of self-improvement blogs are really vague and ultimately not always useful, there is a huge amount of value in determining who YOU want to be and how you can get there.

    Really nice stuff.

  22. I took the Meyers-Briggs a while back, and it was pretty accurate. By accurate I mean how I was then. Like you I’ve changed dramatically over the last few years.

    This was a really interesting idea for a post. What I got out of it the most is that there is so much power in the desire to improve yourself. While a lot of self-improvement blogs are really vague and ultimately not always useful, there is a huge amount of value in determining who YOU want to be and how you can get there.

    Really nice stuff.

  23. I have honestly never even taken the Myers Briggs (unless it was forever ago and I’ve forgotten – possible), but I did take the personality trait test from Marcus Buckingham’s “Strengthsfinger,” and found it to be remarkably accurate. My Top 5: Competition, Communication, Maximizer, Belief, and Relator.

    Reading through the descriptions, which aren’t really vague like a horoscope or Tarot card reader I was pretty impressed a test could peg me so well.

    We took the test our first day of grad school, and were able to form some really strong teams based on people’s strengths and weaknesses.

    Keep rockin’ Colin!

  24. I have honestly never even taken the Myers Briggs (unless it was forever ago and I’ve forgotten – possible), but I did take the personality trait test from Marcus Buckingham’s “Strengthsfinger,” and found it to be remarkably accurate. My Top 5: Competition, Communication, Maximizer, Belief, and Relator.

    Reading through the descriptions, which aren’t really vague like a horoscope or Tarot card reader I was pretty impressed a test could peg me so well.

    We took the test our first day of grad school, and were able to form some really strong teams based on people’s strengths and weaknesses.

    Keep rockin’ Colin!

  25. Funny, I just took the test yesterday. Turns out I’m INFJ. Pretty freaking accurate, I admit.

    Hate horoscopes. They ARE vague and seem to be just ‘guessing and hoping to get it right’. I just find it interesting to observe how people who follow them apply them to how they live their lives or what’s happening in their lives.

    But, I agree that there’s no way to classify the world population of individuals into just 12 or 16 ‘types’. I like to think of those test categories as just mere insights of people, because life is very complex, chaotic and always changing and evolving.

  26. Funny, I just took the test yesterday. Turns out I’m INFJ. Pretty freaking accurate, I admit.

    Hate horoscopes. They ARE vague and seem to be just ‘guessing and hoping to get it right’. I just find it interesting to observe how people who follow them apply them to how they live their lives or what’s happening in their lives.

    But, I agree that there’s no way to classify the world population of individuals into just 12 or 16 ‘types’. I like to think of those test categories as just mere insights of people, because life is very complex, chaotic and always changing and evolving.

  27. Yea, I’m not 100 percent sure of I what I think of those tests. I’ve taken the Meyers-Briggs test multiple times spread over the past couple years, and I usually fall into ENFJ and ENTJ. After researching more into it, I would say it fits me pretty well….

    But even astrology. I had a friend who’s into that and she printed me out a report based on my birthday and even time of birth. The more specific you get, the more crazy/scary of how “accurate” it could be.

    But I look at this way, the more you know, the more you appreciate/understand.

  28. Yea, I’m not 100 percent sure of I what I think of those tests. I’ve taken the Meyers-Briggs test multiple times spread over the past couple years, and I usually fall into ENFJ and ENTJ. After researching more into it, I would say it fits me pretty well….

    But even astrology. I had a friend who’s into that and she printed me out a report based on my birthday and even time of birth. The more specific you get, the more crazy/scary of how “accurate” it could be.

    But I look at this way, the more you know, the more you appreciate/understand.

  29. Ive took the Meyers-Briggs for the first time 12 years ago and keep coming up with the same type since then. I’ve found the description to be very accurate for me, but it’s hard to tell what of it is me reading into things.

  30. Ive took the Meyers-Briggs for the first time 12 years ago and keep coming up with the same type since then. I’ve found the description to be very accurate for me, but it’s hard to tell what of it is me reading into things.

  31. Those kinds of tests are cool, if not incomplete, insights. Sometimes they’re totally off, but often they really do tell you why you do what you do or are what you are.

    And I are an INFP. Last time I checked.

    Sh(Th)anks a bunch for another laughably enjoyable post.

  32. Those kinds of tests are cool, if not incomplete, insights. Sometimes they’re totally off, but often they really do tell you why you do what you do or are what you are.

    And I are an INFP. Last time I checked.

    Sh(Th)anks a bunch for another laughably enjoyable post.

  33. The other problem with personality assessments is that they don’t assess your actual personality, but what what you subconsciously perceive your personality to be.

    The Myers-Biggs test should provide you with a strenght rating for each of the four catagories. I am ISTJ, but only the I is strong. My scores were 83/25/12/22, meaning I’m only slightly thinking (ouch!) and judging.

  34. The other problem with personality assessments is that they don’t assess your actual personality, but what what you subconsciously perceive your personality to be.

    The Myers-Biggs test should provide you with a strenght rating for each of the four catagories. I am ISTJ, but only the I is strong. My scores were 83/25/12/22, meaning I’m only slightly thinking (ouch!) and judging.

  35. “I’m a creative genius who excels in business – woohoo!” –> :)

    “could be perfectly happy living a life in solitude with nothing but his books and a quiet place to read and create – wooho…oh…wait…what?” –> :(

    i’m very much the same way though. I chatted with my mom this morning who was ?#$#??!! because of the second. “I can’t live through your tweets and posts!!!” she said. In the midst of calling her irrational, she replied, “you’re just like your dad!!!! and he never came back!!!!” And there was the “ah ha” moment! She fears I’ll go away and never come back. sad! excited for you to come out tomorrow, and excited to talk more about how your parents cope with the worldly and transient Colin. :)

  36. “I’m a creative genius who excels in business – woohoo!” –> :)

    “could be perfectly happy living a life in solitude with nothing but his books and a quiet place to read and create – wooho…oh…wait…what?” –> :(

    i’m very much the same way though. I chatted with my mom this morning who was ?#$#??!! because of the second. “I can’t live through your tweets and posts!!!” she said. In the midst of calling her irrational, she replied, “you’re just like your dad!!!! and he never came back!!!!” And there was the “ah ha” moment! She fears I’ll go away and never come back. sad! excited for you to come out tomorrow, and excited to talk more about how your parents cope with the worldly and transient Colin. :)

  37. Colin, the fact that you worked “on opposite day” into an honest-to-goodness blog post has provided me with a whole new level of respect for you ;)

  38. Colin, the fact that you worked “on opposite day” into an honest-to-goodness blog post has provided me with a whole new level of respect for you ;)

  39. Most CEOs are ENTJs. Myers Briggs never really fits perfectly, but it should tell you what your behaviors tend to be.

    I just found your website and I enjoy your writing and perspective. You just made it onto my pared-down Google Reader. :)

  40. Most CEOs are ENTJs. Myers Briggs never really fits perfectly, but it should tell you what your behaviors tend to be.

    I just found your website and I enjoy your writing and perspective. You just made it onto my pared-down Google Reader. :)

  41. I have always found personality tests interesting. Though I don’t believe in labeling myself or others I love taking them because they basically represent the test taker at least on some level. I think it’s somewhat unfortunate to sum a person up in just a few words though. We are complex beings and depending on our mood these results can change. I’ve taken a personality colors test 4/5 years ago and 2 weeks ago I took the same test again and came up with different answers. These tests rarely account for growth. And again, they don’t take into account how complex we are as individuals. :)

    Interesting post!

  42. I have always found personality tests interesting. Though I don’t believe in labeling myself or others I love taking them because they basically represent the test taker at least on some level. I think it’s somewhat unfortunate to sum a person up in just a few words though. We are complex beings and depending on our mood these results can change. I’ve taken a personality colors test 4/5 years ago and 2 weeks ago I took the same test again and came up with different answers. These tests rarely account for growth. And again, they don’t take into account how complex we are as individuals. :)

    Interesting post!

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