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The Best You Can Do vs the Best You Can Do With What’s Available

You are probably aware of what your best is in a given circumstance.

Even if you’ve never pushed yourself to your absolute limit, it’s pretty obvious whereabouts it might be found, and knowing this helps you judge how much effort to put into a given activity for the maximum results for the time that you have.

But what about those situations in which the resources are limited?

The math changes. Whereas before you would calculate based on two variables (your skill level and how much time it takes to achieve it), now you are forced to include a third (availability of necessary resources).

In many instances, this added complication will limit the positive results you’re able to achieve in the amount of time you’ve allotted.

If you’re able to be creative, however, this additional limitation can actually result in higher yields.

As long as you’re willing to be creative and roll with the punches, the box you’re forced to work within can actually become a foundation to stand on, allowing you to reach greater heights.

Keep this in mind the next time you find yourself confronting a new barrier and freezing up at the prospect of dealing with it.

Update: January 6, 2017

This is something I struggle to explain to perfectionists, sometimes. Trying to achieve your able best is not always the best pursuit, as 1. perfection is not attainable regardless of the circumstances, and 2. it’s even less attainable in circumstances in which your resources, including your time and energy, are more constrained than usual.

Aiming for perfection under these circumstances, then, is even more harmful to one’s psyche than usual, as you can’t help but fail, and fail hard.

On the other hand, if you can adjust your expectations accordingly, and even aim for a different sort of victory, you’re far more likely to end up with something not just palatable, but maybe even revolutionary.